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Young Christian Workers organise Koranic schools forum in Ghana


Acting on survey findings that foreign-born child beggars were only being educated in informal Koranic schools, a Young Christian Workers team in a Ghana parish has organised a seminar to promote better educational opportunities for the children.

According to Ghana HomePage, the one-day forum on how to mainstream "non-formal" Koranic schools and to reduce the high incidence of child begging was attended by Christians and Muslims community leaders and some proprietors of the Koranic schools at Bawku.

The YCW President, Denis Asampambila, said a survey conducted on begging for alms in the municipality revealed that all the children were from the Koranic schools.

He said most of the children, who were brought by their parents from neighbouring countries to learn the Koran, had to fend for themselves since the proprietors could not feed such pupils properly.

He said even though the learning of Koran was good, formal education would be of immense help to shape the future of these children.

Abdul Rahman Gumah, a local government official, expressed concerns in a speech read for him over the risk these children faced in order to feed themselves.

He appealed to Islamic clerics and Koranic proprietors to include formal subjects in their lessons for the pupils to have better perspective of education.

The chairman of the Christian/Muslim Dialogue Committee, Alhaji Salifu Gumah, underscored the need for mutual trust and respect for each other's religion without jeopardising the education of children.

The vice-chairman, Rev Sylvanus Ayoubire, assured Muslim leaders that their wards sent to Christian schools would not be indoctrinated with the Christian faith.


SOURCE
Forum on non-formal Quranic schools held at Bawku (Ghana HomePage 30/7/06)

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1 Aug 2006