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ACU hosts conference on saltmarshes


The Australian Catholic Univeristy's North Sydney (MacKillop) campus has hosted Australasian Saltmarshes 2005, a conference that explored the status and ecology of coastal saltmarsh in Australia and New Zealand.

The event was organised under the auspices of the Society of Wetland Scientists and the Centre for Environmental Restoration and Stewardship.

"Coastal saltmarsh has recently been listed an endangered ecological community in New South Wales under the Threatened Species Conservation Act," said ACU National's Director of the Centre for Environmental Restoration and Stewardship, Dr Neil Saintilan.

60 delegates heard speakers present leading-edge research on the ecological contribution of saltmarsh (to fish, birds, bats, etc), the ecology of saltmarsh plants, and management issues relating to the impacts of sea-level rise, off-road vehicles and the control of mosquitoes.

"Saltmarshes, located in the littoral zone of estuaries, are an important part of coastal ecosystems," said ACU National PhD student and member of Environmental research group - ANSTO Environment, Debashish Mazumder who presented with Dr Saintilan at the conference. "Australian saltmarsh area is decreasing due to agricultural and urban development and invasion by mangroves. Our research studies have important implications for the management of coastal vegetation in temperate Australia."

Since the introduction of the Bachelor of Environmental Science course in 1995, ACU National has developed a substantial reputation for research in the ecological sciences, which has seen the formation of numerous strategic partnerships with leading environmental agencies in Australia.

SOURCE
ACU National hosts conference on Australasian Saltmarshes (CathNews 24/2/05)

LINKS
ACU National | Centre for Environmental Restoration and Stewardship
Wetland Care Australia
Changes in Saltmarsh Areas


25 Feb 2005