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Abuse Crisis: Poll - most priests want celibacy discussion


Three stories today: •A poll of priests in a US diocese shows more than half want discussion on celibacy. •Report of a meeting of 190 priests with Bishop in NY. •UK priest remanded in NZ.

CathNews struggles each day to try and give an overview of the many stories that appear in the international media each day on the abuse scandals. These days we hardly even mention the many reports of court cases in the United States. There are three significant stories this morning though:

The Des Moines Register reports:

Most priests surveyed in the Archdiocese of Dubuque favor an open discussion of the Catholic celibacy rule, according to a recent survey.

Central Iowa Call to Action mailed the survey asking, "Do you favor an open discussion of the mandatory celibacy rule for diocesan priests?" to 222 active and retired priests in the Dubuque archdiocese.

One hundred and two priests answered questions on the survey. Among those, about 56 percent said they favor a discussion of celibacy rules, while 39 percent rejected the idea and 4 percent were undecided.
Bishop William Murphy
The New York Times has a report:
In a soul-searching session, the besieged bishop of Long Island's nearly 1.5 million Roman Catholics met on Monday with 190 priests concerned about his leadership and the diocese's problems stemming from the sexual-abuse scandals.

Bishop William F. Murphy called the meeting "very helpful" and said it explored "areas of agreement about the direction of the diocese and also differences of opinion."
In New Zealand a priest was remanded on bailyesterday having been extradited back to New Zealand from the UK reports the NZ Herald.

SOURCES - FULL STORIES:
Des Moines Register - Many priests favor celibacy discussion
NY Times - L.I. Bishop Meets Priests Critical of His Leadership
NZ Herald - Extradited former priest remanded on bail



21 Jan 2004