Vatican     HOLY SEE TO CONSIDER CANONISATION OF REFORMER DOROTHY DAY
The Holy See on Thursday agreed to consider whether to grant sainthood to Dorothy Day, heroine of the Catholic left, journalist, anarchist and pacifist, ignoring objections from church traditionalists and possibly Day's own wishes.
   The move marks only the first step on a long road to sainthood, which among other things requires that Day's supporters prove she is responsible for two miracles.
   Dorothy Day converted to Catholicism after a youth of reckless adventure. By age 30, she'd had an abortion, a daughter out of wedlock and a divorce. Most of her friends were socialist intellectuals on the Lower East Side of New York, and were none too fond of the church.
   After converting, she dedicated her life to New York's poor and immigrants, building hospitality homes that operated much like homeless shelters. Her endeavour grew into the national Catholic Worker movement, a social justice crusade conducted in revolutionary tones new to the church.
   Her nonconforming nature was acknowledged on Thursday by Cardinal John O'Connor, who at times has been reluctant to promote her cause.
   "It has long been my contention that Dorothy Day is a saint," he wrote. "Not a 'gingerbread' saint or a 'holy card' saint, but a modern day devoted daughter of the church."
   
AP
20/3/00

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